DE

New Residence in Bamberg

Please note

Please note that the Prince Bishop's Apartment is closed for the time being due to a fundamental restoration; it will be open again from 1 October 2020, 1 pm.
1.10.2020, 1 pm to 4.10.2020: Visitors can go around on their own.
From 5.10.2020: The apartment is accessible only with a guided tour. The tours (every half hour, small groups) are in German, but English information is available in the rooms.

We ask for your understanding for the restrictions.


Prince-Bishop’s Apartment

Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 17
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 18
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 19
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 21
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 19
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 19
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 20
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 21
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 22
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 22
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 23
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 24
Picture: Prince-Bishop's Apartments, Room 27

This suite of rooms on the first upper floor was furnished from 1703, immediately after the completion of the two Baroque façade wings, as the permanent apartment of Prince-Bishop Franz von Schönborn (r. 1693-1729). His successors also lived in this apartment. This explains some of the changes made in the original Late-Baroque furnishing under Prince-Bishop Friedrich Carl von Schönborn (r. 1729-1746) and in particular under Adam Friedrich von Seinsheim (r. 1757-1779).

Unlike the ‘electoral rooms’ with their relatively uniform Late-Baroque style, this suite of rooms combines various types of decoration to form a richly contrasting ensemble that represents the entire style spectrum of the 18th century – from the heavy, Late-Baroque stucco-work ceilings of Johann Jakob Vogel (1661-1727) to the playful, charming Régence decoration of the Second Antechamber and the mature Rococo forms of the ‘Yellow Salon’ and culminating in the cool elegance of Materno Bossi’s (1737-1802) Neoclassical stucco-work in the ‘White Hall’ and the 19th-century furnishings in the dressing-room and bedroom. The present furnishing does justice to all these various styles, and is based closely on the existing archival and photographic sources.


 
show background
show content
increase contrasts
Use standard view